Exploring the Artifacts: Just a Matter of Time

 

Popular from 1600 to 1650, the Lantern Clock that is located in the Governor’s Parlor of the Manor House is just one example of many that were produced during that period of time. The design, English in origin, is characteristically known for its square, lantern shape, single hand face and ornate engravings. Lantern clocks were hung on the wall and were broader than the Gothic wall clocks that were previously popular.

 

Almost entirely constructed from brass and driven by weights, Lantern clocks were modern for their time and fulfilled all the important requirements of a clock, such as keeping a time standard, having a driving force, and having a counting and indicating system.

The lantern clocks would later be replaced by the Longcase Clock (seen right and below), which became popular in the 18th century.  This later design would show off a woodworker’s skills by encasing the mechanical functions with intricately-designed panels.   

 

The 17th-century lantern clock served its purpose for not only reminding William Penn of the time, but was also certain to impress the numerous guests who would have been visiting the Governor’s manor.

 

 By Mary Barbagallo, Intern

Edited by Hannah Howard

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